Concord, Massachusetts

On Saturday last I had the pleasure of visiting Concord, Massachusetts. Concord is the birthplace of the American Revolution (Battle of Lexington and Concord, 19 April 1775) and also the birthplace of American Transcendentalism. Transcendentalism was a literary, religious and philosophical movement that had it’s grounds in the Unitarian church. This group of like-minded individuals struggled to make sense of a changing world. They wanted to incorporate modern ideas with traditional spirituality and sought a new kind of freedom. They believed  people are at their best when truly “self-reliant” and independent. “It is only from such real individuals that true community could be formed.” [1]

Emerson quote self-reliance

Emerson quote on self-reliance

Most of the Transcendentalists were involved in social reform movements, especially anti-slavery and women’s rights. They believed that “at the level of the human soul, all people had access to divine inspiration and sought and loved freedom and knowledge and truth.” [2] They urged a return to nature and the pondering of philosophical truths.

The major figures in the movement in Concord were Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller and Amos Bronson Alcott.

Concord reformers

Susanna, my research assistant and traveling companion, poses with images of the Concord reformers

 

[1] “Transcendentalism”, Wikipedia [2] Jone Johnson Lewis, “What is Transcendentalism,” Transcendentalists, 1995-2002, http://www.transcendentalists.com/

 

 

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